Tag Archives: bacteria

Why do people have such different microbiomes from one another?

Discussing a computational approach to answering what controls inter-individual variability in the human microbiome. Modulating human microbial communities continues to be an area of intense academic and entrepreneurial interest because of the role of the human microbiome in determining health and … Continue reading

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Summing up: Exploration of the Virome in Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Norman et al.

Last week we drew our attention to the virome as discussed in “Disease-specific alterations in the enteric virome in inflammatory bowel disease” (Norman et. al). Continuing on the thread of ‘other’ components of the microbiome from our discussion last month … Continue reading

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“Disease-specific alterations in the enteric virome in inflammatory bowel disease” [Norman et al, 2015]

Is IBD going viral? Pursuant to last month’s journal club discussion on the importance of examining the fungal mycobiome, a closer look at the intestinal virome seemed like the logical next step. Eukaryotic viruses have the ability to interact with IBD risk … Continue reading

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Response to May 29, 2015 Journal Club: “Modulation of Post-Antibiotic Bacterial Community Reassembly and Host Response by Candida Albicans” [Downward et al, 2013]

Although this is a slightly older paper, the role of fungi in the gut microbiota is becoming an increasingly prevalent topic of discussion among microbiome groups, making this discussion a timely one. This group also previously published two papers on … Continue reading

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Should we care about fungi? The mycobiome: an emerging field of the human microbiome research

With the advancement of next-generation sequencing in the last decade, our knowledge about the trillions of microbes that the human body harbours has exponentially increased. Microbiome research has mostly been focused on the study of bacteria notwithstanding that the classical … Continue reading

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Culturing the microbiome

Join us this Thursday (MDCL 2230, 3:30pm) for a discussion of the importance of growing human associated bacteria in culture. Dr. Michael Surette (a faculty member here at McMaster) will talk about culturing methods and present the following paper which … Continue reading

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